Personal Resilience – Mind Rescue Kit

Stressed and overwhelmed? This simple course will help you to take back control of your life.

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Mind Rescue Kit is exactly what it sounds like – a practical course that will take you from stressed and overwhelmed to calm, focused and resourceful.

It combines ideas and exercises from Psychology, NLP and Coaching to increase your mental resilience, creating a positive effect for you in your life.

You learn everything you need to know through a series of practical exercises, so you can make a positive difference in your life while you’re still trying it out.

Specifically, you’ll learn:

  • How to take control of your state of mind (and why that’s so important)
  • How to master your internal dialogue (a master-skill)
  • How to make goals like the world’s most successful people do
  • How to recapture your drive and stay motivated
  • What feedback really is – and why you need to get it right

In short, you’ll understand yourself a bit better, so you can get yourself into a more resourceful mindset and have a workable plan for your future.

If that’s what you need, sign up below.

£75 £15 while places last.

Go here to book now

NLP, Mastery and Success

What could your life be like if someone gave you a compass that always points the way to success?

success_compass

There are ways of thinking about your aims, goals and desires that are different – and far more powerful – than those you currently use. Ways that put more of your life under your control, making it easier to get what you want.

successThere is more to it than determination. There are activities that successful people definitely don’t do, because they know those actions lead only to failure. They know what the actions of success are – and how to repeat those time and again.

Successful people ask better questions about the things they want, because they know how to build a blueprint for success. In fact, if you can’t get the answers, even your most strenuous efforts will fall far short of the results you truly deserve.

When you make a study of success and compare the highest achievers, patterns start to emerge. Patterns in their thinking, behaviour and outlook on life. Patterns that are often profoundly different from the norm.

These people became special by their own efforts. Successful people don’t work harder than others, though they often work hard to get what they want. They’re not necessarily any more intelligent than the average person. Most were not born into wealth or privilege either. What they do have is a set of skills that many people do not even know exists.

In this course, you can learn those skills, modelled from some of the world’s most successful people.

Learn how to:

  • build a blueprint for success with 10 simple questions
  • stay totally focused throughout your master plan
  • use any results – even failure – as material for creating success
  • master your inner success system and make it work for you – even while you sleep!
  • keep your life balanced throughout the process.

Through a series of simple exercises, you will learn how to think, act and react in ways that will move you towards the things you want from life.

These new skills will be your compass, always keeping you on track, so you can have more of the things you want with less of the time and effort.

As you move through the course, you will put it into action in your life and begin to make success part of who you are.

Go here to book your place and access the material straight away.

NLP – Daily Practice and Integration

Too busy to practice your NLP? Build your skills in only 5 minutes each day with this new training program.

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You’ve completed your NLP Practitioner training and want to make the most of your new learning.

What do you do next?

Some people take more training or join a local NLP practice group. Some people do nothing.

In my experience, those who make the most of their NLP do so by making it part of their everyday life.

  • I don’t mean doing therapy or changework with friends and family.
  • Nor do I mean becoming an ‘NLP bore’ by talking about NLP constantly.
  • I don’t mean changing your job to ‘live the dream’ of being an NLPer.

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Those who have the greatest and most enduring success integrate their NLP learning seamlessly into a variety of normal contexts, improving their daily lives in the process.

That’s why I designed this 8-week integration program – to guide you through that process.

How does it work?

Each week, starting on Day 1, you will receive a concise audio lesson of approximately five minutes duration. The lessons are brief and to the point, so you can easily find time to listen to them before the week’s tasks begin.

Every other day you will receive a brief email outlining that day’s task or exercise. Each task or exercise will help to integrate that week’s learning material into your natural awareness, language and behaviour.

Go here to book your place and access the material straight away.

Creative Solutions – NLP and Creativity

Looking for solutions? Expand your creative skills on this 4 week course and save time, money and effort in the process

Creativity is the most prized ability in business today because new ideas can save you time, money and effort.

creativeDespite its great value, few people know how to become more creative, because many people think that creativity is an inborn skill. They couldn’t be more wrong.

Creativity is something we can all have, whether we realise it or not. It is a skill, an attitude and an outlook – all of which you can learn, perfect and train. For example, why do artistic people go to art college? They’re learning skills that will help them to better express their creativity.

There are two parts of the creative skill:

  • coming up with interesting ideas, new perspectives, or solutions to problems.
  • expressing those ideas in a meaningful and accessible way.

This training course focuses on the first part of creativity, which is arguably the more valuable one. Ask a painter how to paint or ask a writer how to craft a story and they will have plenty of practical advice to share. However, ask them – or any creative person – how they come up with their ideas and they will struggle to give you a practical answer.

They’re much more likely to tell you that ideas ‘just come to them’ or seem to ‘pop into their heads’. And that doesn’t give you anything you can use to duplicate the process.

Fortunately, there are ways of accessing that information. There is a structure to creativity, drawn from careful study of creative thinkers – a highly practical way of becoming more creative.

In this course, you will learn several simple ways to enhance your personal creativity.

Learn practical ways to:

  • Tap into your deepest creative resources
  • Synthesize new ideas and applications from existing ones
  • Use your resources to improve on past solutions
  • Take ideas from other areas and creatively “re-purpose” them

Through a series of simple exercises, you will learn four fundamental processes and begin to make creativity a part of who you are.

Go here to book your place and access the material straight away.

NLP Language – Meta Model

Struggling to cut to the heart of the problem? You can take control now by asking the right questions.

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The meta-model is a way you can identify patterns in language that show you how a person thinks in a fundamental way.

It reveals how they personally see the world – and how they see you and others too. Think about the potential – what could you achieve with that knowledge?

The meta model will show you their assumptions, the limits of their thinking and what they deeply believe is true.

This means you can begin to ask questions which cut right to the heart of the issue – pointed, intelligent and transformative questions.

Assumptions

When you make assumptions, sometimes you will get it wrong. The consequences can be small or they can be serious. Some misunderstandings can end a relationship or cost a business millions. All because you were wrong about what you thought you understood. With these tools, you will strip away misunderstanding and avoid potential disaster.

This level of the meta-model recovers hidden information and combats vagueness.

Limited Thinking

Everyone has gaps in their understanding. With the meta-model, you will find those gaps and see the edges of their worldview. Through a series of simple questions, you can open up their world and help them to do the impossible. The result is transformative and can create a better future for all.

Underlying Beliefs

Everyone has deeply buried ideas about how things are – how the world works, what people are like and what you need to know to make it to the top. At this level of awareness, you will hear the clues in their language and in your own. Here is where you free your mind from the past and open up to a wealth of possibilities in your future. The result is a revolution for the mind.

Take control

With the meta-model, you can slice through bluster and vagueness, eliminate objections and take control of the conversation. You’ll be able to identify faulty thinking patterns and intervene powerfully. You’ll be able to map the thinking patterns of excellence and make them your own.

Learn faster, understand more deeply, ask transformative questions and create breakthrough.

How does it work?

You will learn five patterns each week for the first three weeks as you descend deeper into the model. I demonstrate every pattern with examples across the breadth of normal life, so you can apply the meta-model everywhere. Every situation becomes an opportunity to practice and develop your mastery of these skills. In the fourth and final part, you learn how to combine everything you’ve learned and apply it as a single powerful system.

Whether your needs are in the field of business, coaching, therapeutics, sales, learning or every part of life, the course contains everything you need to make these skills your own. This course is an opportunity to gain an edge – a significant advantage over your competitors in every area of life.

You can enjoy all of this for a single course fee of only £75.

Take control today – sign up here: Meta-Model and access the material straight away.

A quick reality check for your 2016 plans – 3 ways to seize control while there’s still time left

"So, Bookface, how are your plans for this year?" "Well, I filled my quota of cat pictures back in January..."Time for a quick reality-check. It’s now over a third of the way through 2016 – have your plans for this year materialised yet, or have you already told yourself “well, maybe next year…”

If that’s you, it’s time to be proactive and to begin designing your future.

Now, Woody Allen wasn’t far wrong when he said “If you want to make God laugh, tell him about your plans.”

In other words, not all designs work out as planned, so I’ve provided some guidelines that successful people use implicitly and which you can begin to use explicitly.

These are:

While following these systems doesn’t guarantee success, they will definitely show you what is workable and give you ways to get started on your hopes and dreams instead of waiting and hoping.

That’s it. Be proactive – do something definite and do it today…

Working with Belief Clusters – Part 3: How Values Form Chains

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Working with Belief Clusters – Part 3: How Values Form Chains

Previously, I demonstrated how beliefs and values are related and how beliefs form chains. In this third part of the series, I show you how values also form chains – but only if you elicit them correctly…


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Working with Belief Clusters – Part 3: How Values Form Chains

There is a completely different way we can track the formation of chains – this time through the connections between values.

However, it’s really important to elicit the person’s values without imposing any sort of order on them.

In this instance, we’re just modelling the value structure and relationships that currently exist.

There are, broadly speaking, two formal values elicitation questions and both have different functions.

1 – “What’s important about X?”

This question identifies the values in a particular area of life, X.

For example:

“What’s important about relationships?” will tend to elicit a value in the context of relationships.

So far, so good. One way to progress from there is to keep eliciting values connected to relationships. The formal way to do this is to ask:

“What else is important about relationships?”. This will tend to elicit another value in the context of relationships. Then keep repeating this question until you get a list of values.

However, if this is the only type of question you ask, you will get a long list of values relevant to the context of relationships, but you will not have any information about how those values are connected to each other.

So the classic thing which is done in this situation (especially by life-coaches) is to impose a hierarchy. This is done by asking:

“Which one of those values is the most important?”
or
“If you had to do without one of these values, which one would it be?”
or
“List your values in order of importance.”

(It’s quite common to advise people to do this – just Google ‘NLP values hierarchy’ to see some examples.)

However, if you do this, you’ve just lost something really important and re-structured how the person perceives their values. This is bad.

I know – some of you may be thinking:

“But I’m sure values form a hierarchy. What about the ‘hierarchy of values’? and what about Maslow’s hierarchy?”

Firstly, the hierarchy of values. We made it up and it has lasted because it appeals to our need for simple order. That’s all. Elicit values cleanly and you won’t find a linear hierarchy. Just test it out and see for yourself.

This is not to be confused with a ‘hierarchy of criteria’, which imposes order on criteria (which includes, but is not limited to, values) in order to leverage aspects of that order.

Secondly, Maslow’s work has nothing to do with values whatsoever. Read up on that if you’re still not sure about it.

So you have a list of values and imposing a hierarchy is not going to show you how the values are naturally linked together. What do you do?

You ask a second type of values-elicitation question:

2 – “When you have [value] what does that give you?”

Or simply

“What’s important about [value]?”

This allows you to identify direct relationships between values and therefore you travel down the values chain, rather than across the surface.

For example:

“What’s important to you about work?”
– a sense of accomplishment

“ok, so a sense of accomplishment. When you have that sense of accomplishment, what does that give you?”
– it gives me satisfaction

“Ok. So when you get that satisfaction from your work, what does that give you?”
– a feeling of well-being

So far, we have identified the linear chain [accomplishment -> satisfaction -> well-being] Is it a hierarchy? It looks a lot like one until we keep going.

“What does that well-being give you?”
– a sense of accomplishment

What we really have here is a simple loop. This is not uncommon, by the way and there are other structures to be found too, if you elicit the values chains cleanly.

[By ‘cleanly’, I don’t mean use the ‘clean language’ approach, necessarily. Just stop assuming how the system is ordered and find out what is really there.]

Access the next part of this series to find out:

  • What other structures do values chains form?
  • What strengths and weaknesses does each structure have?

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Working With Belief Clusters 2 – How Beliefs Form Chains

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Working with Belief Clusters – Part 2: How Beliefs Form Chains

To create lasting change, we often need to look at the bigger picture, especially when working with limiting beliefs, which are connected into larger structures. In this second video in the series, I show four ways in which beliefs chain together.


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Working with Belief Clusters – Part 2: How Beliefs Form Chains

In order to identify clusters – complex structures with many linkages – we need to look first at simple connections. I call these ‘chains’. Let’s get started.

Working with the ‘If – Then – Means’ belief structure from the previous part, there are several ways that chains can form:

1. Cause -> Effect -> Further consequences

When we start with the cause and effect part of the belief, often the effect has consequences too.

if X then Y (means Z)
and
if Y then A (means B)

X -> Y -> A

For example:
If I try then I’ll fail (means I’m a failure)
If I fail then I’ll never try it again (means I’m a quitter)

These causes, effects and further consequences work like a row of dominoes.

2. Cause + Condition -> Effect

The chains can also branch, especially if multiple factors work together to create different effects.

For example:
If I try then I’ll fail (means I’m a failure)

If I fail and I’m stressed then I’ll never try it again (means I’m a quitter)
or
If I fail and I’m not stressed then I’ll try it again (means I’m learning)

This way, we get a complete and more complex structure.

X -> Y
Y + stress -> A
Y (no stress) -> X

Notice how ‘trying it again’ loops back round to the start (X)

3. Cause -> Effect 1 + Effect 2

There can also be multiple consequences to a cause-effect.

For example:

If I try then I’ll fail (means I’m a failure)
If I fail then I’ll never try it again (means I’m a quitter)
and I’ll get depressed

In this case, getting depressed is a second effect of failing, rather than a consequence of never trying it again.

4. Cause 1 or Cause 2 -> Effect

The or structure demonstrates that some effects can stem from a variety of causes.

For example:

If I try then I’ll fail (means I’m a failure)
or
If I don’t try then I’ll fail (means I’m a failure)

If a condition or its opposite create the same effect, as in the example, this is a bind, which is a special condition of this structure. In general, limitation is what happens when the flow from cause to effect narrows rather than branching.

From all this, it’s clear that cause and effect chains can form complex structures. However, those structures can be extremely unwieldy and when creating change, it’s sometimes difficult to know where to focus your efforts.

So we need to have a way of targeting the crucial areas. Values can help with this.

Access the next part of this series to find out:

  • How to identify and elicit values chains
  • how to elicit values without damaging the chains

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Working with Belief Clusters – Part 1

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Working with Belief Clusters – Part 1: Beliefs and Values

Beliefs aren’t isolated things, so they shouldn’t be worked with in isolation. This is the first in a series about working with beliefs as clusters. Part 1 describes how beliefs and values are connected.


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Working with Belief Clusters – Part 1: Beliefs and Values

Many people talk about beliefs and how they form into ‘clusters’, yet they only work with single beliefs when they want to create change.

They don’t describe:

  • how beliefs cluster,
  • why that is important,
  • how to identify the beliefs in a cluster,
  • or how they are interconnected.

I’m going to answer some of those questions in this series of videos, so when I’m finished, you’ll have some simple theory and some actionable knowledge too.

Values are an interesting place to begin, because

  • they’re easy to identify
  • they’re interlinked
  • they relate directly to beliefs
  • they focus you on the areas which are most important

Again, many people elicit values in a particular way that imposes order on them and will prevent you from seeing how values interlink.

So before we get into values, let’s look at how they’re related to beliefs.

Values and Beliefs – Relationship

First, some basic information about how a belief is structured:

It can be useful to look at a belief as a meaningful system of cause and effect.

Robert Dilts* uses this useful structure to map beliefs onto:

if X then Y means Z

where X is the cause
where Y is the effect
and Z is a value judgement

How is this useful?

Firstly, you can also use the ‘If – Then – Means’ structure to make sure you have identified all the elements relevant to the belief you’re examining.

For example: (If I try then I’ll fail, which means I’m a failure)

‘trying’ is the cause.
‘failing’ is the effect.
‘failure’ is the value.

So we can use this structure to identify values from looking directly at beliefs.

If we’re already working with beliefs, why bother with values?

Well, we can backtrack from a value to identify a belief, or set of related beliefs.

How?

In this case, we ask about the rules surrounding a value.

Suppose, for example, we elicited the value ‘failure’.

You can ask:
“How do you know when you have failure?”
and
“How do you know when you haven’t failure?”

You might get the answers: “I know I have failure when I try something and fail (don’t succeed)” and “I know when I don’t have failure when I try something and I succeed (don’t fail)”.

Again, it helps to use the ‘If – Then – Means’ structure to make sure you have the structure of the whole belief.

So that is how values and beliefs are connected.

To summarise:

Working between beliefs and values is useful.

From beliefs to values:

  • What does it mean when X causes Y?
  • If X leads to Y, what does that mean?
  • If you Y because X, what does that mean?

From values to beliefs:

  • How do you know when you have Z?
  • How do you know when you don’t have Z?
  • What makes you Z?

Access the next part of this series to find out:

  • How to identify and elicit belief chains
  • how belief chains can branch and loop

*Dilts, R., Sleight of Mouth, (1999)

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Role 2: Role-modelling solutions

Now you’ve met your role model and had a taste of what it’s like to be them. Don’t you wish they were around when you needed their help of advice though?

Here’s a way you can have the next-best thing.

Role-modelling solutions

  1. Pick a situation where you would like the advice of a particular role model.
  2. Encapsulate the situation: Be sure where the experience begins and ends.
  3. Begin by running the experience through from your own perspective.
  4. Next, imagine your role model is present.
  5. As before, ask them questions and glean any advice you can.
  6. Now step into your role model and look at the situation again. From that perspective, what would you do differently? What would you keep the same?
  7. When you’ve gained all you can from that perspective, step back out, taking the knowledge with you.
  8. Now step back into yourself at the beginning of the experience. Given your new knowledge, how do you respond differently and how does the situation unfold this time?
  9. Cast your mind forward to a time in the future where you may encounter a similar situation. How does it play out in that instance?

In this way, you can draw upon a different, expert perspective for insight and problem solving. To gather further perspective, repeat the exercise with a second, different role model.

Interesting? Your questions and comments are welcome below.

(This is just one of the techniques you learn on our NLP Practitioner training. Go here to find out more)